“The Mountains Have Called”

Glacier National Park, MT

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed July 18th, 2013

Camera and lens: Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 at 1/8 of a second

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

 

Story also coincides with "First Impressions" and The Rush of Life"

 

            As we rounded the bend, the soaring mountain peaks and lush green valleys opened up before me.  For the rest of the winding Going-to-the-Sun Road, heading from West Glacier on the way to Logan Pass and the continental divide, I sat speechless in utter awe of the scale of what lay before me… A glorious light glistened throughout the mountains whose peaks seemed to reach into the heavens.  Cascading waterfalls plummeted down from the melting snow of the high elevations where the trees no longer grow, carving their way down through the forests and into the valleys.  As if angels were singing, my first impressions of the West, of our previous five days spent backpacking in Glacier National Park’s wilderness were truly brought into light in the face of this view.

            The hike to Akokola Lake would be my initiation into the Park… Up and down the ridge line through open meadows caused by burns and wildfire giving way to new growth which filled my nose with the delightful scent of fresh pine.  Into deep forest and to the edge of Akokola, the peaks rising to the north, reflected perfectly in its waters, stole my breath.  This was remote wilderness.  The next morning as I walked down to the lake to capture first light kissing the peaks of those mountains, I half expected to see a scene of all of nature’s creatures harmoniously drinking from its shores.

            Over the next four days, my brother, his wife, and I hiked and camped through this wonderland of dense temperate rain forest, soaring mountain peaks, open meadows and pristine lakes, an experience I’ll never forget.  On our last night of backcountry camping, at the head of Bowman Lake, I had perhaps my most beautiful backpacking experience to date… The hike along the water’s edge, peering through thick jungle-like forest to the Caribbean Sea of Bowman’s waters, all in the face of towering Rainbow Peak, Mt. Carter, and Thunderbird Mountain on the opposite side was an enlightenment in itself.  Add to our scenery that we were abruptly caught in a thunder and hail storm, exhilarating the adventure, and only to arrive at the most amazing campsite I have yet to experience at Bowman’s head.  Roaring through the site is a creek of the most milky white water I’ve ever seen.  Flowing to the lake, it meets a bed of magnificent colored stones which all but stop it dead in its tracks, sending the milky creek trickling over rainbow rock into turquoise blue.  The sun began to set as storm clouds cleared and under the moon and stars of big sky country, I lay in my hammock gazing out unto this unbelievable view down the valley before me.  Rocking gently, I listened to the lap of gentle waves hit the shore, lulling me to sleep.

            Naturalist John Muir once wrote that Glacier National Park has “the best care-killing scenery in our continent.”  I thought of these words as well as many others of natural inspiration during this week of escaping the hustle-bustle and cares of daily life to come out into the wilderness and experience the true “rush” of life.

            Out here in the high-country, it is Winter, Spring, and Summer all at once.  We hike through snow in July with perfect 80 degree temperatures and mountain goats as friends, meadows bloom and burst with wildflowers, and the mountains which separate our country’s weather carry glaciers feeding into lakes of the most unbelievable turquoise Caribbean blues.  Humbled beyond words on the return hike from the magnificence of Hidden Lake, the culmination of our journey, I knew in my soul that the mountains have called.

"The Mountains Have Called"

“First Impressions”

 Glacier National Park, MT

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed July 15th, 2013

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 90mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F22 for 1 second

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

"First Impressions"

“The Rush of Life”

 Glacier National Park, MT

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed July 17th, 2013

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 90mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F16.5 for 6 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

"The Rush of Life"


“Appreciation”

Shenandoah National Park, VA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed October 23rd, 2012

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 for 4 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

 

            We were immersed in Autumn - the colors, the blowing and crackling of the leaves in the beautifully crisp air by the babbling brook, my senses were ignited down in this Shenandoah hollow…

            …But, I had planned out a thoroughly ass-kicking day leading us out of the hollows up through the White Oak Canyon over an 8-9 mile stretch and an elevation increase of roughly 2,200 ft. continuing on to the Appalachian Trail and to the top of Hawksbill Mt.  This may not sound that arduous to the more seasoned backpacker and I’ve since conquered more daunting tasks with more ease, but this was one of my first truly grueling days out on the trail.  I had sucked through my water not much more than half way through the ascent and the day, which was warm at 70 plus degrees in late October.  With the sun baking on me and dehydrating, trying not to drain my brothers’ supply either, I recall at times during the last couple of miles staggering and having to tell myself that ‘this is what you love’ and that ‘you’re on the AT for the first time man, enjoy it!’  By the time we reached the spring to fill up on water and find a camping site about a half-mile from the summit of Hawksbill, I collapsed in near tears of pain and exhaustion.  The unseasonably warm night, however, was quite comforting under the stars and unbelievably bright glow of the waxing crescent moon.  And the following morning, sunrise from the highest peak in Shenandoah NP, took all the pain away.  I told my brother after the dawn’s glowing display that I was going to call this photograph “Appreciation” because of my realization that this will most likely often be what it takes to get there, to experience such things far off the beaten path, out in the wild.

"Appreciation"


“Find Your Way”

 Bald Eagle State Forest, PA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed October 13th, 2011

Camera and lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 90mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F16 for 4 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

 

 

            This story has been in my head since the moment I captured the photograph, a moment that is very close to my heart.  And as time would have it, I have found even more meaning to the image and its title of late…

            At the time in my life when I found this remarkable scene, I was in the midst of a very difficult personal battle in dealing with the recent ending of a relationship.  This would be the first photograph I exposed in nearly a two-month time frame (believe me, that’s a long time for me, haha) since it had all began.  And I found these circumstances coupled with the beautiful eeriness of this blanketing fog creeping through the patch of sourwoods and their glowing red leaves to be of utter significance.  It had taken about a week of me getting back out there enjoying the onset of Autumnal colors for everything to align in this moment, for me to trip the shutter again and ultimately, I feel, to begin finding my way through my art and love of nature.

            In getting back to doing the things that I love and fighting through all the uncertainty swirling around in my head, I did eventually find my way through the storm.  And along the way, I realized a thing or two as well.  Although it may sound obvious, this lesson seemed so profound when I faced it head on - if we are to learn and grow, we must confront our entire reality of experiences, from the glory of our great triumphs to our shadows of deep sorrow.  We must look at both, feel the joy and the pain, and make peace with it all.  I have found in staying true to oneself, ones heart will never lead us astray. 

            It is easy to lose ourselves in the stresses of everyday life.  We can easily forget what’s really important to us, finding ourselves lost in a mess created in our own heads.  In this sense, we are always “finding our way” through life.  If I can leave you with any bit of inspiration in what I hope to have translated here – it is that I do honestly believe our passion in life holds the key to inner happiness.  I believe that if our heart and soul are the forces behind whatever it is we aspire to achieve, we can in time accomplish anything we set our sights upon.  For me, it is nature and the dream of experiencing as much of this beautiful Earth as I possibly can in my lifetime with the hope that my art can help preserve Her for generations to come.  Whatever juncture in the road you find yourself upon, follow that dream, you may just find your way…

"Find Your Way"


“Basking in the Glow”

Shenandoah National Park, VA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed June 3rd, 2014

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 for 16 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

 

            I have backpacked, camped, and hiked throughout Shenandoah National Park at least a dozen times over the past 3 years.  Living in Pennsylvania, it has become my "backyard" National Park, if you will. Growing up in and around the Appalachian Mountains my entire life, I'll never forget that first experience of entering the gates of Shenandoah on Skyline Drive and how, all of a sudden, everything just looked and felt different.  I think it's a testament to just how pristine our National Parks are! And to this day, it never ceases to amaze me, that feeling I get as soon as I enter Shenandoah, that suddenly, things are just truer, just better.  It may not have the scale of some Western National Parks, but at close to 200,000 acres of mountainous forests and with forty percent of that being federally designated Wilderness, believe me, this place is pure Mother Nature! I learn something new, and have countless wildlife experiences every time I am here.  This image is one of many I have captured in my Shenandoah adventures, and represents just a slice of the splendor which awaits!  Photographed last early June 2014, I decided to hike down to see Lewis Falls for the first time as the sun was setting before heading to set up camp for the night.  It was breathtaking...  The setting sun was angled right into the hollowed out ridge line basking the falls and cliffside in its glow! Perched high on the facing overlook cliff, I set up and fired off a few exposures just before the sun was down and the light had passed. What an exhilarating moment I remember it being on that warm June evening! I sat and enjoyed twilight a bit before hiking back up the mile and a half and then off to find my camp spot by the light of my headlamp.  All the while, thinking what a day it had been.

"Basking in the Glow"


“Time Is What You Make of It”

Acadia National Park, ME

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed July 30th, 2014

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 for 3 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

 

            It was my third adventure to Acadia National Park this past Summer(late July 2014) and I had spent the entire week camping and hiking throughout the park, exploring much more of its beautiful and diverse landscape than I had been able to on my previous journeys.  On the day before I was to return, I decided to re-arrange my travel schedule and stay one more day...  It had been a very rainy and foggy week overall and I hadn't been content with my sunrise, or lack there of, experiences as I had only made one attempt to that point.  So yearning for another opportunity and with a hopeful forecast, I awoke about 4am, rolled out of my hammock at Seawall Campground and headed for the coast near Monument Cove.  The morning turned out to be one of the most blissful moments I have ever been fortunate enough to bear witness to.  As the pinks and purples began to glow in the sky, I had the place to myself other than a couple sunrise bicyclists I passed on the way.  As the sun shone its fire down to the sea, my mind and body were surrendered by the beauty of the moment, a feeling I am not soon to forget!  It's true what they say about the primordial experience of witnessing dawn in Acadia NP.  I always get the feeling it's as though I'm witnessing the beginning of time.  After a few exposures, I soaked in all that this morning had to offer.  I made my coffee and breakfast right there on the granite cliffs, watching wave after wave crash into the coast, scrambling from one granite boulder to another up and down the shoreline, reveling in the endless work of Father Time, and filled with utter peace by what my decision to stay had led me to, as this day was just getting under way, and there would be much more Earthly wonder in the making...!

"Time Is What You Make of It"


“To Last a Lifetime”

Great Smoky Mountains National Park, TN/NC

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed September 14th, 2014

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 90mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 for 8 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

 

            It was myself, my brother, and our father, the first time in The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, TN/NC for all three of us and the first time my brother and I were able to get our Dad out backpacking!  It was truly unique experiencing these beautiful Appalachian Mountains on this grand of a scale and just how bio-diverse these ancient mountains really are!  Although the adventure was one of the wettest and dampest overall that either my brother or I have experienced to date, and thusly being a bit of a damper for our father, it was nonetheless an amazing experience traversing through different climate zones and various types of forest.  From mixed deciduous hardwoods, through rhododendron tunnels (which we dubbed “the enchanted emerald forest”), and up to huge Hemlock realms we went.  This image is, to me, a beautiful representation to sum up our adventure.  This photograph is taken right beside our camping location on this mid-September's late afternoon.  To my companions chagrin (haha!), the fog really made the atmosphere for me, creeping through this dense forest of towering Hemlocks and Red Maples.  As I was setting up my camera, my brother was asking me where exactly I was going to hang my hammock...  “Oh, you mean using that dead tree there?” he asked.  “Ahh I’m sure it’s fine” I responded.  Eeeeerrrrrrrr, BOOM!  About 30 feet to my right, a tree fell over...  No one hurt, laughs all around, and needless to say I reconsidered my sleeping placement.  We soon got a fire going to warm the spirit and later were serenaded to sleep by the katydids, crickets, and chattering cicadas in a thundering echo like I have never heard before...  Much like the ancients dwelling here, memories were made "to last a lifetime."

"To Last a Lifetime"


“Redemption”

Acadia National Park, ME

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed July 25th, 2013

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 for 8 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

 

            Waking before dawn, the dark forest is alive with the songs of cicadas and the smell of pine and fir.  In the distance, a faint sound of the ocean’s waves crash into the rocky shore.  It is not even 4am, most of the world a slumber, but dawn here comes early…  And if I want to be among the first to see the sun break the horizon, I must still reach the granite peak of the domed mountain-top, where one can gaze out unto the Atlantic and witness a primordial beginning.  Up here, it may be mid-Summer, but I am completely exposed to strong winds and 40 degree temperatures.  Staking out my spot by the light of my headlamp, my hands are going numb as I begin to set up.  No matter though, the smell of the sea in these chilling gusts and the burning orange, pink and purple sky casting down its indescribable light on the cresting waves has me entranced…  This is a beauty beyond words, and I feel blessed to bear witness to this magnificent dawn’s unfolding.

            I knew what I had to do to accomplish this feat, and had been stewing upon it for, well about a year.  I had been here the previous Summer at this same time and squandered an opportunity for photographing one of the most mind-blowing sunrise explosions I have ever seen.  But this dawn would be mine, it was my birthday after all, and I couldn’t have asked for a more breathtaking way to celebrate it.  This would be my song of redemption.

"Redemption"


"Life's Possibilities"

Along the Foothills Trail, SC

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed April 28th, 2012

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F22 for 4 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

 

Story also coincides with "Soaking Up Life" and "A Peek See"

 

           I could make the argument that in many ways, this experience is the one which really set the stage for my life's passion for adventure and preservation...

           In April of 2012, I drove South to visit my brother in South Carolina for my inauguration into the world of backpacking.  He had been getting into it (backpacking, that is) for a couple of years and we had loosely discussed getting together for an adventure for a while let's say.  Well, during the holidays of 2011, more concrete plans were made and here I was.  Using mainly his extra along with his wife's gear, he took me out for 3 days/2 nights on the Foothills Trail in Northwestern SC.  To say the 8 miles on day 1 kicked my ass would be an understatement!  I'll never forget the feeling of floating away upon taking the pack off for lunch only a few miles in, which, by the way, is never quite as funny feeling as that first time.  I also don't think I'll ever forget how exhausted, punished, and well, down right alien I felt for the last two miles of that hike.  But I loved it.  

           We arrived at night one's campsite just in the nick of time to hang a tarp to pass the thunderstorm that had been brewing for most of the afternoon.  The sky at once opened up and the storm let loose, ahhhh that smell!  As we awaited its passing, I had the notion to photograph the scene in front of us from under our shelter.  And am I glad I did!  I absolutely love how green and teeming with life the forest is.  As I gaze upon it, I see how life giving this Spring rainfall truly is, how every tree and leaf are soaking it up.  I see it breathing.  I can feel its heartbeat.

           As the storm passed on, we set our camp and chopped/sawed our firewood.  And just before preparing our dinner, I caught a magnificent sunset moment from the top of the waterfall not more than a stone's throw from our tent.  That is, after all, one of the main reasons my brother felt this location would be a really cool photo opportunity for me - as he had noticed here before that at this time of year, one gets a clear view of the sun setting beyond the distant mountains from the top of the waterfall.  Although I didn't get a "clear" view due to our stormy conditions, the moment was purely exhilarating!  With the falls flowing and plunging a good 80-100 feet right at my feet, I had a peek see through the thick of the surrounding forest into misty mountain ridge lines and an ethereal pink glow in the clouds that only a breaking thunderstorm can provide.  After I snapped a couple exposures, I turned to face my brother and pumped my fists in the air as if triumphant.  "A Peek See" into just a few of nature's grandest elements is what it truly was...  

          The night was thick and damp, but by the fire was bliss.  In the darkness, as we conversed about life around the flame, we witnessed some strange blue glow of a gliding insect that to this day we have yet to identify.  Some species of firefly we do not know, perhaps?  Whatever it was, it was nature's pure magic.  What a way for one to spend their first day and night backpacking, I thought as the fire died down beside a thundering waterfall...  We, much like the forest, were "Soaking Up Life."

           Bruised and battered at dawn the next morning, I stood photographing the waterfall.  As I was setting up, I caught my brother out of the corner of my eye, strolling down the trail to greet me with a cup of coffee he just brewed at our campsite, maybe 50 feet behind the top of those falls you're looking at...  What a moment, what an experience.  It was only a weekend long, but it changed my life forever and set me on the path for where I am today, opening the doors to so many of "Life's Possibilities" and what I believe to be my life's purpose.  Thanks bro!

"Life's Possibilities"

"Soaking Up Life"

Along the Foothills Trail, SC

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed April 27th, 2012

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 for 32 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

"Soaking Up Life"

"A Peek See"

Along the Foothills Trail, SC

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed April 27th, 2012

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F22 for 32 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

"A Peek See"


"May Your Spirit Be the Guide"

Poe Paddy State Park, PA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed May 3rd, 2012

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 90mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F16 for 16 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 100

 

          Upon my return home from that life changing backpacking adventure with my brother in South Carolina, I found myself reflecting on many things...  As much as I was becoming obsessed with nature photography, I had never really before been out for much more than day trips/hikes or leisurely strolls close to home.  And now, I had just driven through the entirety of Shenandoah National Park twice, a bit of the Blue Ridge Parkway, and camped out for two nights backpacking - all over the course of one week!  With one evening left before going back to work, I decided to drive out to Poe Paddy State Park about an hour from my house to see if this Dogwood might still be flowering.  You see, the evening before I set out on that adventure, I had come to this very spot.  Spring blooms had come extremely early this year, and by mid-late April most areas were predominately green.  Then out of nowhere came a freak late April snowstorm!  Roughly six inches dumped on all that fresh green, it was beautiful!  It melted considerably fast with warming temps the next day and the remaining blossoms had survived.  But, that first evening here, I had lost the light to attempt a good photograph.  So it had been stirring in me, wondering if I might still have a chance of this Dogwood being in bloom a week later...

          Miraculously, it was!  A precarious hop, skip, and a jump across some rocks put me out on the Big Poe Creek in great position.  Balancing on a rock, trying not lose my gear or myself in the water, this ethereal fog creeping in and consuming the mountains at sunset, I snapped the shutter.  And in this moment of awe at Mother Nature's unpredictable beauty, I rationalized all the events in my life over the past 9 months - that made me question so many things about happiness, passion, and how we move forward - which led me to this adventure and to this moment of clarity.  I listened to my heart and let my spirit guide me and I've been doing my best to do so ever since.

"May Your Spirit Be the Guide"


"A Home Away from Home"

Shenandoah National Park, VA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed May 14th, 2014

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 for 8 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

 

           This backcountry locale in my "backyard" National Park, Shenandoah, has become a home away from home for me.  Since the first time I camped near this serene waterfall I have returned more than half a dozen times to date (and only planning on adding to that over the years to come).  Right here, I have enjoyed some of my most profound and intimate moments of experiencing immaculate Mother Nature.  And the fact that it lies within a section of Shenandoah's Federally designated Wilderness, makes it even more special.  Hiking 3.5 miles in darkness the night before, I awoke on my first morning here and rolled out of my hammock, slid down the carved out hollow right next to me and photographed this magical moment at dawn.  The most amazing black bear encounter of my life has taken place right here,  as a young juvenile played and foraged for nuts in late Autumn not more than 20 yards from me for a good 10 minutes or so!  I have been here in early Spring to celebrate Earth Day and seen these Falls booming at 2-3 times the volume you see here.  At the perfect time in October, this forest is ablaze with Maples, Hickories and Oaks.  And, every time, whether it be amidst the intoxicating smell of fresh Spring rain, or Autumn leaves in the cool air, and the deafening sound of the falls as I hear nothing but them aside from an occasional owl hooting, I can lean back and lose myself in dreams under the stars and the moonlight... This place soothes my soul, this is living folks, this is real magic!

"A Home Away from Home"


"Ice, Kissed by Fire"

Mid-State Trail - Rothrock State Forest, PA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed February 23rd, 2011

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 90mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 for 3 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

 

           I remember a few snow followed by ice storms this particular Winter which left the deciduous forests of the mountains a magical icy wonderland.  When I left my house about an hour and a half before dawn that morning, it was 0 degrees.  The mile plus hike on the mountain top was invigorating to say the least!  As I got set to await the Sun's greeting, winds were whipping hard, reading well into the negatives I'm sure.  But the moment that giant fireball peaked over the horizon and lit the icy branches in front of me aglow, I felt nothing but its beautiful warmth.  It lasted only a few seconds, but wow!

"Ice, Kissed by Fire"


"A Thundering Silence"

Bald Eagle State Forest, PA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed January 9th, 2013

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F16 for 2 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

 

            One of the most beautiful Winter Dawn's I have captured on film.  And it wasn't easy, but worth every part of the hour long pre-dawn drive which landed me stuck in the snow and having to hoof it as fast as I could about a half mile up a ridge line to this overlook in time to witness dawn erupt in thundering silence!  The quiet of Winter mountain mornings after recent snows is a deafening silence that never ceases to amaze me.  I had hoped for some nice sunrise colors based on the clearing storm forecast but never could have expected this magnificence!

"A Thundering Silence"


"A Fire is Brewing"

Farm Fields of Pine Grove Mills, PA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed July 12th, 2010

Camera and Lens:  Olympus OM2000 with Soligor 28mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F11 for 3 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

"A Fire is Brewing"


"A Guest at Dawn's Arrival"

Bald Eagle State Forest, PA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed July 4th, 2013

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F16 for 8 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

"A Guest at Dawn's Arrival"


"A Wash By the Sea"

Acadia National Park, ME

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed July 26th, 2013

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 90mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 for 4 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

"A Wash By the Sea"


"Autumn Sugar"

My Father's Woods, PA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed October 20th, 2015

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 for 1 second

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

"Autumn Sugar"


"Be Still My Heart"

Along the Appalachian/Long Trail, Green Mountain National Forest, VT

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed October 7th, 2015

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 90mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 for 8 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

"Be Still My Heart"


"Beneath a Greater Sky"

Grand Teton National Park, WY

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed July 17th, 2015

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 at 1/8 of a second

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

"Beneath a Greater Sky"


"Blazing the Trail"

Shenandoah National Park, VA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed October 30th, 2013

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F32 for 4 seconds

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

"Blazing the Trail"


"Burn Into the Night"

Farm Fields of Pine Grove Mills, PA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed August 13th, 2013

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F11.5 for 1 second

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 50

"Burn Into the Night"


"By the Babbling Brook"

Shenandoah National Park, VA

Exposure notes:

Date:  Photographed October 21st, 2012

Camera and Lens:  Mamiya RB67 with 65mm lens

Aperature and Shutter Speed:  F22 for 1 second

Film:  Professional Fuji Velvia 100

"By the Babbling Brook"


"Christmas Morning"

My Father's Woods, PA